Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Asia-Pacific Dermatology & Cosmetology Conference Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Seon Il Jang

Jeonju University South Korea

Keynote: Enzyme-treated date plum leaves extract ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in hairless mice

Time : 11:00 - 11:45

Dermatology Meetings 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Seon Il Jang photo
Biography:

Seon Il Jang completed his Ph.D. in Immunology from Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Republic of Korea, and did his post-doctoral research in the Department of Fish Immunology, Aberdeen University, United Kingdom. Presently, he is a professor of immunology, in the Department of Health Management, Jeonju University, Republic of Korea. His research field is centered around the therapeutic approach of atopic dermatitis: cytokines, chemokines, fillagrin, and natural products. He has more than 300 published papers in renown journals.

 

Abstract:

Date plum (Diospyros lotus L.) leaf has been widely eaten for its medical importance such as sedative, antiseptics, antidiabetic and antitumor. Recently, we have demonstrated that its extract possesses the anti-obesity, anti-pruritus, protective effect of UV-induced skin damage and drug-induced liver damage.  However, no studies have been conducted to investigate the biological effect of enzyme-treated date plum leaf extract (EDLE). The present study evaluates the ameliorative effects of enzyme-treated date plum leaves extract (EDLE) in the atopic dermatitis (AD) mouse model. The results showed that administration of EDLE significantly attenuated the AD-like skin symptoms and clinical signs in 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) and house dust mite (HDM) antigen-treated hairless mice. EDLE administration suppressed the serum level of immunoglobulin E (IgE), interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) in AD mice. Furthermore, histological analyses revealed that EDLE administration suppressed the increased epidermal thickness, dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and infiltration and degranulation of mast cells in AD-like skin lesions. In addition, we revealed that EDLE treatment inhibited the production of IFN-γ, IL-4, and TARC in concanavalin A-stimulated splenocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that EDLE might be a candidate to treat AD.

 

Keynote Forum

Jiwon Choi

Jeonju University South Korea

Keynote: Hydrolyzed celery extract ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in hairless mice

Time : 11:45 - 12:45

Dermatology Meetings 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jiwon Choi photo
Biography:

Jiwon Choi has completed her Ph.D. in Physiology from Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju, Republic of Korea. Her undergraduate and postgraduate degree completed in diagnostic radiography from Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. Presently, she is the associate professor of department of Radiological Science, Jeonju University, Republic of Korea, Her research field are diabetic mellitus and diagnostic radiography such as Computed tomography, radiography.

 

Abstract:

Apium graveolens (celery) has been traditionally used as an herbal food and medicine. The current study investigated the ameliorative effects of acid-hydrolyzed celery leaf extract (HCE) on 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) and house dust mite (HDM) antigen-induced atopic dermatitis (AD) mouse model. HCE administration decreased DNFB/HDM-induced dermatitis severity and dorsal skin thickness in hairless mice. Histological analyses demonstrated that HCE administration alleviated the epidermal thickness, dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and infiltration and degranulation of mast cells in AD-like skin lesions. Moreover, HCE administration attenuated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in AD-like skin lesions in mice. Further analysis revealed that HCE treatment suppressed the production of nitric oxide, IL-6, and PGE2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Thus, these results suggest that HCE can be considered as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic skin diseases.